Our Favorite 9mm Pistols of 2023: The Best 9mms for Any Scenario

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Updated

Jun 2023

The 9mm pistol is the staple handgun for many Americans. These weapons are versatile, affordable, and easy to learn with, but sifting through the mountain of 9mm pistol models, sizes, configurations, actions, brands, etc. has led more than one aspiring handgun owner to abandon their search altogether.

No need to stress. Below, you’ll find a quick overview of what you should look for when you need a new 9mm pistol (or if you’re buying your first one). Plus, we’ve collected the top 9mm pistols currently on the market. Let’s dive in!

9mm Pistol Comparison

There are many fantastic 9mm pistols on the market these days, but most important to find a gun that’s comfortable to shoot and one you can commit to shooting regularly.

I’ve highlighted some of my absolute favorite 9mm pistols below, across the key categories that most users will find their needs falling into.

Our Top Picks

Displaying 1 - 1 of 10

Awards

Price

Overall Rating

Description

Rating Categories

Accuracy

Ergonomics

Features

Fit & Finish

Reliability

Value

$590.99 at Palmetto State

Jump to Details

51

Our fav full size 9mm, the original Glock striker-fired pistol with a 17+1 capacity & iconic design.

9/10

8/10

8/10

9/10

9/10

8/10

$746.99 at Palmetto State

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40

A classic, proven performer with many variants and solid magazine capacity, though heavy and large.

6/10

7/10

7/10

7/10

6/10

7/10

$630.99 at Palmetto State

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55

A high-performing competitive pistol with advanced features, including adjustable fiber optic sights and optics-ready design.

9/10

8/10

9/10

10/10

9/10

10/10

Badge

$879 at Palmetto State

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39

Our fav 9mm compact, the Shield is a reliable, easy-to-use, and affordable 9mm polymer pistol.

7/10

6/10

6/10

7/10

7/10

6/10

$649.99 at Palmetto State

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41

A legendary, reliable, and versatile handgun with a 15+1 round capacity, making it ideal for home defense and concealed carry.

7/10

7/10

7/10

7/10

7/10

6/10

$949.99 at Palmetto State

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34

A versatile 9mm pistol that offers great factory sights, modularity, solid capacity, and a quality trigger.

8/10

5/10

6/10

6/10

5/10

4/10

$620.99 at Palmetto State

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36

A versatile, optics-ready, polymer-framed 9mm pistol with adjustable palm swell, FN quality, and rail, though expensive.

8/10

5/10

7/10

6/10

6/10

4/10

Badge

$1268.99 at Palmetto State

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29

The best sub-compact anywhere, a game-changing compact pistol with solid capacity & incredible versatility.

7/10

4/10

4/10

5/10

5/10

4/10

$598.99 at Palmetto State

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39

The smallest 9mm Glock with 6+1 capacity, light weight, and ankle carry option, while the Glock 43X offers 10+1 capacity and slightly more weight.

7/10

6/10

6/10

7/10

7/10

6/10

$399.99 at Palmetto State

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22

Offers similar concealability and performance to the more expensive P365 at a more affordable price.

4/10

3/10

4/10

3/10

3/10

5/10

Best Full Size 9mm Pistols

1. Best Full Size: Glock 17

Glock 17 CTA

$590.99

Glock 17 Gen 5 9MM Pistol

Performance Scores
Accuracy9/10
Ergonomics8/10
Features8/10
Fit & Finish9/10
Reliability9/10
Value8/10

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Specifications:

  • Weight: 24.97 oz
  • Capacity: 17
  • Length: 7.95 in
  • Barrel Length: 4.49″
  • Width: 1.18 in

Pros

  • Classic style
  • Beginner friendly
  • Easy to shoot
  • Fantastic capacity

Cons

  • Large
  • Looks like every other Glock
  • Limited slide serrations

One of the most legendary striker-fired 9mm Glock pistols, the G17 launched the Glock empire when it arrived on the market in the early 1980s. The first successful polymer-framed pistol, it overcame an initial uphill fight– nobody likes change– and has encouraged a crop of imitators.

The G17, Gaston Glock's 17th patent, still in production 40 years after hitting the market, has three internal safeties (trigger, firing pin, and drop) and is immediately recognizable and iconic.
The G17, Gaston Glock's 17th patent, still in production 40 years after hitting the market, has three internal safeties (trigger, firing pin, and drop) and is immediately recognizable and iconic.

Boasting a 17+1 shot capacity, this full-sized combat handgun has gone on to be the most adopted in Western military service worldwide, with countries ranging from Britain and France to South Korea and Singapore trusting it.

The latest variant, the Gen 5 model, includes upgrades such as the Glock Marksman Barrel, which is extremely accurate and easy to shoot. If you want all the details on the G17 check out our hands-on review.

Stacking the G19 and G17 side-by-side, the Glock 19, in general, is 0.67 inches less in overall length than the Glock 17, generation over generation, while standing 0.43 inches shorter.
Stacking the G19 and G17 side-by-side, the Glock 19, in general, is 0.67 inches less in overall length than the Glock 17, generation over generation, while standing 0.43 inches shorter.

2. Beretta 92X

Beretta 92 CTA

$746.99

Beretta 92X 9mm Pistol

Badge

40

EXCEPTIONAL

Based On 79 Ratings
Performance Scores
Accuracy6/10
Ergonomics7/10
Features7/10
Fit & Finish7/10
Reliability6/10
Value7/10

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Specifications:

  • Caliber: 9mm
  • Barrel Length: 4.25 inches
  • Overall Length: 7.75 inches
  • Weight: 27.2 ounces, unloaded
  • Magazine Capacity: 13+1

The Good

  • Incredibly proven performer
  • Many variants to choose from
  • Solid magazine capacity
  • Tons of used 92s floating around

The Bad

  • Large, heavy pistol
  • Tough to determine country of manufacture
  • Compact models only have a 13+1 round magazine capacity
  • Double-action/single-action hammer-fired layout with a decocker seems dated in a world of micro-compact polymer-framed handguns

One of the most venerable double-stack 9mm pistols on the market, the steel-framed Beretta 92 has been around for almost 50 years.

There is a reason for that: it just plain out works, and as I detailed in our historical look at the Beretta 9mm pistols, the 92 really was a watershed moment in handgun design. I went way deep on the 92 if you’re interested. Beretta introduced the new “X” series of the Model 92 a few years ago and has since upgraded them to an optics-ready standard.

The Beretta 92X Compact -- with its external hammer and steel sights -- in the wild
The Beretta 92X Compact -- with its external hammer and steel sights -- in the wild

While they’re certainly one of the most recognizable handguns anywhere, they’re not the lightest, easiest to operate, nor do they offer the most firepower, but the 92 is a true classic that delivers on performance and looks.

Adopted by dozens of militaries worldwide, including the Pentagon who has used it for the past four decades, this “Back to Back Gulf War Champ” is a great pistol and still very relevant today in its third generation, the Vertec 92X series. While originally a full-sized pistol with low recoil, the 92 is also produced in shorter Centurion and Compact variants.

History

The 92X line, on introduction in 2019, included a full-sized model with a 4.7-inch barrel, a Centurion with a 4.3-inch barrel, and a Compact with both a 4.3-inch barrel and a shorter grip frame. This has since morphed into an RDO (Red Dot Optic) 92X standard, which includes an optics-ready slide.

Likewise, the introductory version of the 92X Compact, as shown in this review, was offered both with and without a 3-slot Picatinny accessory rail on the dustcover in front of the trigger guard. Mine is the “smooth” variety that does not have the rail. All other variants are rail guns.

My 92X is the smooth version without the Pic rail.
My 92X is the smooth version without the Pic rail.

Features

The 92X series, except the more bespoke Performance and 92XI models, all share the same basic feature set to include a slim Vertec frame, anti-friction coated magazines and internals, a beveled magwell, skeletonized hammer, front and rear slide serrations, and a black Bruniton finish on the slide.

Controls

The standard controls include ambidextrous oversized G-style “competition” style slide-mounted thumb decocker levers instead of the more traditional F-style safety/decocker found on most other Beretta 92 variants. The push-button magazine release, which drops the mags free for me every time, is mounted on the left side of the frame but can be swapped to the right.

The front and rear slide serrations and black Bruniton finish give these 92s a very svelte feel.
The front and rear slide serrations and black Bruniton finish give these 92s a very svelte feel.

Ergonomics

Between the thin Vertec frame and very aggressively textured thin grips, the 92X series feels svelte in the hand and lends to easy controllability.

Reliability

We ran the 92X through our standard 500-round test and evaluation drill with a mix of range and defensive ammo to include both steel and brass cases. We had zero malfunctions on the range. These Tennessee-built Berettas run.

Slide-mounted thumb decocker levers are classic 92, if not a touch dated by today's standards.
Slide-mounted thumb decocker levers are classic 92, if not a touch dated by today's standards.

Sights

The 92X series as a rule ships with high visibility orange/black combat sights that are easy to pick out in day and low-light conditions. Newer RDO models include an optics cut for micro red dots, although Beretta doesn’t ship the guns with a full kit of plates– you have to order the one you want. The sights are compatible with M9A3 models.

The 92X series as a rule ships with high visibility orange/black combat sights.
The 92X series as a rule ships with high visibility orange/black combat sights.

Trigger

The 92X has a thin short-reset trigger made of billet steel, which feels very similar to Berettas of old but has a much more shallow trip on reset. I found mine to break cleanly at 6 pounds in double action and 3 pounds in single.

Accuracy

The 92X is easy to control but the DA/SA nature of the first shot means that you often have a “flyer” that spoils the group’s overall size. To check that, I ran the pistol from the bench at 15 yards in SA mode only and were rewarded with 2-inch five-shot strings on average. In short, it is extremely accurate so long as you put in the time to master the trigger.

The 92 is extremely accurate so long as you put in the time to master the trigger.
The 92 is extremely accurate so long as you put in the time to master the trigger.

Aftermarket Support

The basic Beretta 92 series has been around since the 1970s and has been extensively cloned by folks like Girsan and Taurus. Going past that, guys like Ernest Langdon and Bill Wilson have taken to offering just about every custom option, part, and service for these guns one could desire.

Odds are, if you want something done to or added to a 92X, it is just a click away.

3. Competition Pick: Canik SFx Rival

Canik SFx Rival CTA

$630.99

Canik SFx Rival

Badge

55

EXCEPTIONAL

Based On 5 Ratings
Performance Scores
Accuracy9/10
Ergonomics8/10
Features9/10
Fit & Finish10/10
Reliability9/10
Value10/10

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Specifications:

  • Weight: 29 oz.
  • Capacity: 18+1
  • Length: 8.1 in
  • Barrel Length: 5″

Pros

  • IDPA, IPSC, and USPSA compliant
  • Amazing value
  • Adjustable fiber optic sights and optics-ready
  • Superb 90-degree diamond-cut aluminum flat trigger
  • Removable external mag-well

Cons

  • Not for new shooters
  • Trigger can be too light for some
The SFx Rival is one of my favorite competition pistols.
The SFx Rival is one of my favorite competition pistols.

Our favorite competition nine, the Canik SFx Rival offers an unbelievable value & is legal to use in IDPA, IPSC, and USPSA competitions without restrictions — but also makes for a great plinking gun and gives you room for every home defense accessory you could want. It’s also large enough that it’s very comfortable to shoot, especially with 147gr ammo.

My favorite upgrade is the trigger, which is a lightened 90-degree diamond-cut aluminum flat trigger — and it’s a joy to use. The trigger shoe texture gives you a nice contact patch that provides consistent trigger pull that helps me get on target. Additionally, the SFx Rival is fully ambidextrous, enabling you to swap both the magazine and slide releases.

I had more than 50 women shoot my Canik pistols (including the Rival) at an annual even I host, and there was nothing but positive feedback. These guns run.
I had more than 50 women shoot my Canik pistols (including the Rival) at an annual even I host, and there was nothing but positive feedback. These guns run.

The full-size Picatinny rail allows you to attach your preferred laser or light, and the double undercut trigger guard adds more to the mix by helping me get as high on the grip as possible and suppress recoil. The external mag-well is removable, making it both division compliant and easily customizable.

The SFx Rival pistol comes with two 18-round magazines, two magazine case plates, three different size back straps, and three different size magazine release extensions, so you can start customizing the gun the moment you open the box. Overall, it’s an excellent choice for shooting competitions and one of my personal favorites.

Want more on Canik’s Rival? Read our hands-on review.

Best Compact 9mm Pistols

4. Best Compact 9mm: Smith & Wesson M&P 2.0 Compact

$879

Smith & Wesson M&P Shield M2.0

Performance Scores
Accuracy7/10
Ergonomics6/10
Features6/10
Fit & Finish7/10
Reliability7/10
Value6/10

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Specifications:

  • Weight: 18.3 oz
  • 7+1, 8+1 capacity
  • Length: 6.1”
  • Sights: front and rear white dot
  • Finish: stainless steel and armornite

Pros

  • Very affordable with two magazines
  • Good finish for most major parts
  • Comfortable polymer grip
  • Has good sights

Cons

  • Stock trigger safety makes for a mushy feel

Smith & Wesson edged out their Reservoir Dogs-era metal-framed “wonder nines” in 2012 with the new Military & Police series of the now famous polymer pistol.

It’s no surprise that Smith & Wesson top this chart with a relatively new member of their M&P series: the M&P Shield 2.0 Compact. I have always found the pistols light, reliable, and easy-to-use, but the pistol has a lot to like, including a steel frame and stainless steel Armornite finish for both the barrel and the slide.

One of the top dogs in the 9mm pistol game since 2012.
One of the top dogs in the 9mm pistol game since 2012.

In a nutshell, the coating provides the weapon with a durable finish that has protected mine from corrosion and damage – and despite hundreds of range trips, countless cleanings, and thousands of rounds my M&P looks practically new.

Moving on from hammer-fired DA/SA pistols to striker-fired guns, the new M&Ps had to slog it out against Glock, which had already carved out a big part of the LE market, but the fact the M&P line has better triggers and sights while sporting the same level of reliability and a “made in USA” cache bought the Smiths lots of room to maneuver.

Today, the second generation M2.0 variants, particularly the Compact version, is about the closest thing to a “Glock killer” as one gets. Plus, the M&Ps of all generations have a take-down lever and sear deactivation system that allows for disassembly without pulling the trigger– something most other polymer guns lack.

The S&W Shield has been spun out in a variety of offerings, from the EZ (as in "Easier to Rack") and various chamberings, like this example in 30 Super Carry.
The S&W Shield has been spun out in a variety of offerings, from the EZ (as in "Easier to Rack") and various chamberings, like this example in 30 Super Carry.

For those looking for something in the M&P2.0 neighborhood, there’s also a single-stack subcompact companion to the M&P, the Shield, beating Glock’s 43 series gun by several years.

The Shield 2.0 has a more aggressive grip texture and a hinged trigger safety.
The Shield 2.0 has a more aggressive grip texture and a hinged trigger safety.

Today, the Shield M2.0 has a better trigger than the first-gen models, as well as aggressive grip texture and an optimal 18-degree grip angle for a natural point of aim.

Thin and lightweight, the Shield boasts a 7+1 and 8+1 capacity depending on what magazine you use and the new Shield Plus aims to take on the Sig 365 in the Micro 9 game.

The most contentious aspect of the Shield has aways been the trigger, which has been resolved with the flat faced trigger found on the Shield Plus. Also note the scaled back grip texture.
The most contentious aspect of the Shield has aways been the trigger, which has been resolved with the flat faced trigger found on the Shield Plus. Also note the scaled back grip texture.

Designed with performance and safety in mind

The M&P also offers a full-size frame and comes with an easy-to-access external safety, which I have found easier to use than a number of compact 9mms that mount safeties a bit too close to the slide for my comfort.

I find the factory front and rear white dot sights ease to use and plenty visible in a variety of lighting conditions, even brighter environments or when the sun is overhead.

You get a lot of value out of this striker-fired pistol as well, since it comes with two magazines out of the box. Ultimately, it’s a durable and serviceable metal-framed pistol that fires the reliable 9mm luger at works well for training, self-defense, and concealed carry.

We break the Shield 2.0 down even further in our hands-on review.

5. Glock 19

Glock 19 CTA

$649.99

Glock 19 Gen 5 FS 9mm Pistol

Badge

41

EXCEPTIONAL

Based On 75 Ratings
Performance Scores
Accuracy7/10
Ergonomics7/10
Features7/10
Fit & Finish7/10
Reliability7/10
Value6/10

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Specifications:

  • Weight: 23.63 oz
  • Capacity: 15
  • Length: 7.28 in
  • Barrel Length: 4.02 in
  • Width: 1.26 in

Pros

  • Lengendary reliability
  • Larger mag release button
  • Ambidextrous slide stop
  • Reversible magazine catch

Cons

  • No finger grooves
  • Only includes 2 backstraps

A more compact version of Gaston Glock’s G17 design, the Glock 19 for many, is the perfect multipurpose handgun.

The Glock 19 is a fantastic multi-purpose handgun.
The Glock 19 is a fantastic multi-purpose handgun.
The Gen2-4 Glock 19 grip includes finger grooves, which were done away with on the Gen5 iteration.
The Gen2-4 Glock 19 grip includes finger grooves, which were done away with on the Gen5 iteration.

With a standard 15+1 round capacity, the G19 stands ready for use in home defense, is enjoyable to shoot on the range (there are documented specimens still ticking with well over 100,000 rounds fired), has more aftermarket support than just about any other firearm ever produced shy of the AR-15, and, when using the right holster for the right person, is a great gun for concealed carry.

The simplicity and safety of the Glock platform also make the G19 an approachable option for novice shooters looking for a first gun that will be simple to maintain and easy to use.

There is a reason the G19 consistently tops the best-selling pistols list. Go for the Gen 5 model for the most current set of features — and for a deep dive, take a look at our review of the G19.

On the fence between the G19 and G17? I break down the differences in our comparison guide.

6. Sig Sauer P320

Sig P320 CTA

$949.99

Sig Sauer P320 Compact 9mm

Performance Scores
Accuracy8/10
Ergonomics5/10
Features6/10
Fit & Finish6/10
Reliability5/10
Value4/10

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Specifications:

  • Weight: 25.3 oz
  • Capacity: 15+1
  • Length: 7”
  • Sights: Front and rear (night)
  • Finish: stainless steel and nitron

Pros

  • Pretty durable overall
  • Has a set of excellent sights
  • Good size and weight
  • Smooth, consistent trigger pull
  • Good magazine capacity

Cons

  • Grip could be a bit more comfortable
  • A big gun relative to other options

The Sig P320 9mm pistol is another great choice, particularly if you want great factory sights. The Sig Sauer P320 Compact has both front and rear sights, with the rear sights offering contrasting illumination so you can use the pistol even in low light or nighttime shooting situations.

Developed to both compete for the Army’s Modular Handgun System contract and offer a more forward-looking alternative to their P-200 series pistols, Sig Sauer introduced the P320 in 2014.

Ditching the common frame and slide format that almost every other semi-auto pistol used, the P320 instead uses a fire control unit that can be swapped out between different grip modules to quickly allow the user to move between full, carry, compact, and subcompact sizes.

The modularity of the design made it a shoo-in for the MHS program, and the military is currently fielding the gun as the M17 and M18 pistols, respectively. This is truly a 21st-century combat pistol.

The P320 platform has served Sig well -- both in terms of the base series as well as more custom options, such as the P320 Spectre Comp.
The P320 platform has served Sig well -- both in terms of the base series as well as more custom options, such as the P320 Spectre Comp.

7. FN 509

FN 509 CTA

$620.99

FN 509 Compact 9mm Pistol

Performance Scores
Accuracy8/10
Ergonomics5/10
Features7/10
Fit & Finish6/10
Reliability6/10
Value4/10

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Specifications:

  • Weight: 25.5 oz.
  • Capacity: 15
  • Length: 6.8″
  • Barrel Length: 3.7″
  • Width: 1.35″

Pros

  • Optics ready
  • FN quality
  • Railed
  • Adjustable palm swell

Cons

  • Expensive

Designed to compete for the Army’s Modular Handgun System program, more than a million rounds were put into the development and testing of the pistol series that was introduced in 2017 as the FN 509.

FN 509 Compact FDE
FN 509 Compact FDE

A versatile polymer-framed striker-fired 9mm, it is available in a long slide (LS) Edge variant for practical/competition shooters (which we reviewed and really liked), standard-length models, Tactical variants with extended magazines and threaded barrels, and Compact options ideal for concealed carry.

Don’t let the fact that it is kind of a sleeper on the market, those who know, know.

The LS (Long Slide) variant takes the 509 in a more competition-focused (and larger) direction.
The LS (Long Slide) variant takes the 509 in a more competition-focused (and larger) direction.

Best Sub-Compact 9mm Pistols

8. Best Sub-Compact: Sig Sauer P365XL

Sig P365 CTA

$1268.99

Performance Scores
Accuracy7/10
Ergonomics4/10
Features4/10
Fit & Finish5/10
Reliability5/10
Value4/10

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Specifications:

  • Weight: 17.8 oz
  • Capacity: 12+1
  • Length: 6.59 in
  • Barrel Length: 3.7 in
  • Width: 1.0 in

Pros

  • Fantastically small
  • Super concealable
  • Decent capacity for a pistol this size

Cons

  • Intermittent failure to return to battery
  • Small grip a challenge for support hand

Sig kind of broke the carry gun market with their P365, the lead entry of a line of pistols that are now considered “Micro 9s” as they are very small, rivaling single-stack subcompacts such as the FN 503 or Glock 43, but have a modified double-stack magazine giving them a 10+1 or 12+1 capacity.

Sig's game changing P365 carry pistol
Sig's game changing P365 carry pistol

Since its initial introduction, Sig has expanded the P365 series with larger XL and XL Spectre models as well as a melted SAS model and the largest of the bunch, the XMacro.

They have also sparked a whole line of imitators that are trying to keep up; however, most of those other Micro 9s, for now at least, should probably still be in the beta-test first-generation stage.

Sig's P365 XMacro has all the build quality you'd expect from a Sig.
Sig's P365 XMacro has all the build quality you'd expect from a Sig.

I’ve been carrying a Sig P365XL with a RomeoZero Elite 3 MOA red dot for about a year. As one of my carry guns, I like the 12+1 rounds of capacity packed into a small compact gun.

The Romeo Zero is not my favorite red dot, but it is an easy option when it comes already outfitted on the gun. This pistol is striker fired with an XSeries straight trigger, and if you’re familiar with Sig’s triggers, it feels similar to those on the P320 and Legion model pistols.

Even with the red dot optic, it is set up with a front sight in case anything fails on the red dot optic.

What I love most about this pistol is the grip texture of the 365 XSeries grip module. Its subtle texture doesn’t rub your skin poorly when carrying but gives you a comfortable purchase of the gun to hold on to during recoil.

The magazine release button is shaped like a triangle and sits almost flush with the grip to ensure you don’t accidentally bump it and release your magazine unintentionally. The slide serrations are easy to grab onto and rack the slide, and depending on the light model, you can still mount a light to the pistol.

We took the P365 XMacro out for a spin, and while it’s a newer, larger take on the P365 series, it shares the same DNA as the previous models but still makes for a sweet concealed carry handgun.

9. Glock 43

$598.99

Glock 43 Single Stack 9mm Pistol

Performance Scores
Accuracy7/10
Ergonomics6/10
Features6/10
Fit & Finish7/10
Reliability7/10
Value6/10

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The Good

  • Absolutely dependable
  • So small and slim that it can be easily concealed
  • Available in G43 and G43x (higher capacity) variants

The Bad

  • Tough to get back on target rapidly
  • Kind of snappy
  • Iddy Biddy Grip

Specs

  • Caliber: 9mm
  • Barrel Length: 3.41 inches
  • Overall Length: 6.26 inches
  • Weight: 16.3 ounces, unloaded
  • Magazine Capacity: 6+1

The smallest 9mm handgun that Glock makes, the “slimline” Glock 43 was introduced in 2015 and was an instant hit. Probably the best single stack 9mm carry pistol on the market, the Glock 43 deserves consideration if you’re in the market for a reliable handgun that scores high on concealment.

Providing a 6+1 capacity pistol that was smaller than some of the most compact .380s and .32s on the market, the G43 soon became the choice of many for concealed carry, be they the average CCW holder or off-duty police.

Hitting the scales at just 20 ounces when fully loaded, the gun is one of the few 9mm pistols that can be ankle carried comfortably. I dove deep into the G43 in our review of Glock’s concealed carry masterpiece.

The Glock 43 Vickers 9mm
The Glock 43 Vickers 9mm

History

First announced as a caliber upgrade from the company’s successful .380 ACP chambered Glock 42, the new 43 series gun offered users 6+1 rounds of 9mm on tap in a slim pint-sized package. In just the first three years it was offered, more than 1 million G43s were sold to a hungry market, vouching for their popularity.

More than 1 million G43s were sold in its first three years on the market.
More than 1 million G43s were sold in its first three years on the market.

Features

Exceedingly slim at just 1 inch over the widest part of the grip, the G43 hits the scales with a loaded weight of just 20 ounces while keeping a respectable 3.41-inch barrel length that allows the pistol to deliver when it comes to performance.

You get a grip that's a touch over 1 inch wide, albeit pretty short.
You get a grip that's a touch over 1 inch wide, albeit pretty short.

Controls

Like most other standard Gen 4 Glocks, the G43 has left-side controls including a push-button magazine release and slide lock. The always mag drops free in my testing or range days but the slide lock, being small and recessed, is often hard to operate, which may force you to just fall back to the “slingshot” method of racking the slide.

The slide lock, being small and recessed, is often hard to operate.
The slide lock, being small and recessed, is often hard to operate.

Ergonomics

The G43 uses Glock’s standard 360-degree RTF texture on the grip. As the pistol is short, at just 4.25 inches tall with a standard flush-fit magazine, the grip is abbreviated and folks with even normal sized mitts will have at least the bottom two fingers left hanging.

This can be fixed using extended magazine base plates.

You can eek out a touch more grip length with some extended mag base plates.
You can eek out a touch more grip length with some extended mag base plates.

Reliability

It is a Glock. I have had zero malfunctions or funny range stories to pass on — after 500 rounds in dedicated testing and with all the range time I have behind me outside of tests.

Sights

Glock’s standard plastic sights are functional and easily replaced, although many folks aren’t fans of the U-shaped rear sight. I find it perfectly usable, but if you don’t, there’s a load of aftermarket options out there — we are talking about a Glock here.

The front sight is, again, totally functional, but I swapped the front out for a night sight because they’re just so much more usable in dim and dark lighting.

 

Glock U-shaped rear sight is a "love it or leave it" kinda deal for many people. I like it.
Glock U-shaped rear sight is a "love it or leave it" kinda deal for many people. I like it.
I swapped the white front out for a night sight to increase the usability when the lights go out.
I swapped the white front out for a night sight to increase the usability when the lights go out.

Accuracy

At practical distances, being 15 yards or less, the G43 performs well, and landing 2-3 inch groups is a breeze. It is only after stretching back 25 yards or more than the short sight radius started to make it hard for me to keep inside an eight-inch circle without serious concentration.

Aftermarket Support

Magazines, sights, and internals are widely available both in Glock’s own factory standard and by third-party companies. There are lots of options to replace Glock triggers with literally dozens of firms making them.

Trigger

Glock bills the G43 as having a 5.4-pound trigger, which I can vouch for in testing and direct measurement with my trigger scape. There is a significant level of “creep” in the trigger, but the trigger is nonetheless functional.

The stock trigger is, well, a Glock trigger, so I've swapped mine out with a Glockmeister TYR Trigger Shoe.
The stock trigger is, well, a Glock trigger, so I've swapped mine out with a Glockmeister TYR Trigger Shoe.

For those who would prefer a few more rounds, the Glock 43X still has a slim profile but offers a 10+1 capacity and is just three ounces heavier, making for an effective concealed carry weapon with a little more on tap.

10. Taurus GX4

Taurus GX4 CTA
Performance Scores
Accuracy4/10
Ergonomics3/10
Features4/10
Fit & Finish3/10
Reliability3/10
Value5/10

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Specifications:

  • Caliber: 9mm
  • Barrel Length: 3.06 inches
  • Overall Length: 6.05 inches
  • Weight: 18.7 ounces, unloaded
  • Magazine Capacity: 10+1 flush fit, 11+1 or 13+1 round extended.

Pros

  • Offers similar concealability and performance to the more expensive P365 at a more affordable price

Cons

  • While the surface controls could be better and the takedown pin feels outdated

The GX4 is an excellent option for those in search of a great EDC pistol that may have been overlooked.

The main feature of the GX4 is its compact nature and easy concealability.
The main feature of the GX4 is its compact nature and easy concealability.

History

Taurus has a long history of producing polymer-framed 9mm pistols, dating back to the PT-111 in 1997. They continued to improve and evolve their designs with the G2 and G3 series, but it wasn’t until May 2021 that they introduced their first “micro-compact” concealed carry defensive pistol: the GX4. In response to popular options like the Sig Sauer P365 and Springfield Armory Hellcat, the GX4 was Taurus’s answer to the demand for a high-performing, concealable pistol.

Features

The standout feature of the GX4 is its compact design and excellent concealability. The gun’s every component feels meticulously crafted to be as slim and lightweight as possible, all while maintaining a budget-friendly price point.

The standout feature of the GX4 is its compact design and excellent concealability.
The standout feature of the GX4 is its compact design and excellent concealability.

Controls
The GX4 features simple controls, with a focus on a “melted” and snag-free design. The slide catch is small and recessed on the left side only, making it difficult to use. The reversible push-button magazine release functions well, and the magazines drop free. Takedown requires a tool, as there is no onboard disassembly lever.

Ergonomics
Despite feeling smaller in the hand compared to other micro-compact 9mm pistols, the GX4 offers good 360-degree texture in the grip and other nice ergonomics, such as thumb tabs on the frame. It carries comfortably, even in appendix positions.

In a wise move, Taurus set up the GX4 to use Glock-pattern dovetail/mounts
In a wise move, Taurus set up the GX4 to use Glock-pattern dovetail/mounts

Reliability

After putting 500 rounds of various factory loads through the GX4, I found it to be highly reliable (and fun) on the range, with no malfunctions logged.

Sights

The GX4 wisely features Glock-pattern dovetail/mounts, but Taurus opted for steel sights instead of Glock’s often criticized plastic sights. The front sight is a fixed dot, while the rear is a blacked-out drift adjustable sight. They are easy to use with no frills. Taurus also offers the GX4 in a TORO package, which includes a factory optics-cut slide for use with micro red dots.

Taurus opted for steel sights instead of Glock's often criticized plastic sights
Taurus opted for steel sights instead of Glock's often criticized plastic sights

Trigger

The GX4 is equipped with a flat-faced, serrated single-action only trigger that feels noticeably better than previous Taurus models. It features a short take-up and a defined wall, breaking at approximately 5.5 pounds. These characteristics are impressive for a factory-standard pack in a striker-fired pistol.

 

GX4's flat-faced, serrated single-action only trigger feels noticeably better than previous Taurus go-pedals.
GX4's flat-faced, serrated single-action only trigger feels noticeably better than previous Taurus go-pedals.

Accuracy

During practical shooting at self-defense distances up to 25 yards, I found the Taurus GX4 to be quite capable on the range. As a small pistol with a 3-inch barrel, it doesn’t offer a lot of sight radius, but it was easy to keep on target without experiencing flyaways.

Aftermarket Support

While holsters for the GX4 seem to be widely available from several makers, there is little support for the gun outside of Taurus’s webstores. However, since the sights are Glock-pattern, you’ll likely find a ton of replacement options available.

What to Look for in a Quality 9mm Pistol

Look for known brands and you'll rarely be disappointed.
Look for known brands and you'll rarely be disappointed.

Few handgun categories have the diversity and sheer number of options as the 9mm pistol. Focus on the following factors and you’ll be able to narrow down your search to a great 9mm handgun that works for you.

  1. Name Recognition
  2. Mature Design
  3. Aftermarket Support
  4. Fit with Your Purpose
  5. Action
  6. Grip Quality
  7. Size & Weight

1. Name recognition

While the caliber started slow, typically just seen in German-made Lugers and Mauser C96 pistols across the first 30 years of the cartridge’s career, the 9mm today is the most popular chambering for modern semi-automatic pistols.

In 2018 alone, some 2 million 9mm pistols were made in the U.S., more than any other caliber– a figure that doesn’t include pallets of guns coming from overseas.

With so many horses in the race, it is always a better idea to bet on an experienced thoroughbred who knows the course instead of an untried newcomer or unsteady nag.

Dropping the horse metaphor for plain talk, the odds you will get a quality pistol from a company like Glock, Ruger, Sig Sauer, Smith & Wesson, or FN– who have made thousands of them over the course of decades to near-universal acclaim– are much better than grabbing some oddball from who knows where.

There’s a reason why Glock Fanboys and HK Diehards exist — those brands have created some of the best firearms in the history of mankind.

Sure, the price difference between, say a Glock and a “Fly by Night 9” may be just $150 or $200, and they may look and feel mostly the same, but when it counts, is your life worth that extra cash?

2. Mature design

The instantly recognizable Beretta 92 is more than a classic design -- it's one of the most proven 9mm pistols in the world. No list of the best 9mm pistols would be complete without it.
The instantly recognizable Beretta 92 is more than a classic design -- it's one of the most proven 9mm pistols in the world. No list of the best 9mm pistols would be complete without it.

Everyone loves the newest thing. When a customer is offered a choice between a solid design with a good reputation that has been on the market for years, or the just-released gee-whiz carry gun that is an ounce lighter, has a cooler finish, and carries two extra rounds for the same price, it isn’t hard to forecast what will likely sell.

However, there has been a nasty trend among new handgun models to come out with issues that are only discovered after they have been in circulation for a few months.

Even top-notch companies are not immune to such problems in beta models. For instance, take the primer/striker drag issues with the early Sig P365 or the more recent recall on S&W Shield EZ, a gun that reportedly tended to go full-auto.

When evaluating choices for a 9mm handgun, or any firearms for that matter, it may be a wise idea to select something that has already gone through its teething problems.

3. Aftermarket support

The M&P has some fantastic aftermarket options, like these extended mags.
The M&P has some fantastic aftermarket options, like these extended mags.

One of the worst thorns an owner of a new (or at least new to them) handgun can run into is to find out that their new 9mm has very few holsters available to fit them, extra magazines cost $75, and there are no options to replace the kind of creepy trigger or sometimes hard-to-see sights.

To skirt problems such as these, either go with an established design that has been in production for several years or double-check to make sure the new model under consideration is supportable. If possible, quickly search for replacement magazines, triggers, extended mag and holster options to get an idea of life cycle costs before committing to a pistol.

Aftermarket support means you can get extended mags and specific shapes that will help with control and comfort.
Aftermarket support means you can get extended mags and specific shapes that will help with control and comfort.

Adjustable sights will allow you to compensate for different variables, while and day/night sights which ensure the pistol will remain usable in a variety of lighting conditions. If these aren’t part of the factory package, knowing you can replace them to optimize your sight picture is a really helpful feature.

Consider whether you’ll need a 9mm pistol with a mounting rail. Some pistols allow you to slot attachments, like lights or laser/light combos to beneath the barrel on an abbreviated Picatinny rail — a perfect home for a pistol light — while others eschew this feature in exchange for affordability.

Many pistols offer a full size rail that gives you room for a light, laser, or other accessory and optics cut for adding an MRD.
Many pistols offer a full size rail that gives you room for a light, laser, or other accessory and optics cut for adding an MRD.

4. Pistol Type & Purpose Fit

While there’s no hard line between the main types of pistols and their fit with a given use case, getting the most out of your gun involves aligning its strengths with how you plan to use it. These generally fall into 3 categories: concealed carry, home defense, and range guns.

Concealed Carry

As the name implies, the goal of a concealed carry pistol is to be concealable. This means shorter (under 4 inch) barrels, smaller frames and lighter weight.

These shorter pistols, with their truncated barrel length, give up sight radius, making them inherently less accurate at distance, and can be less comfortable to shoot due to their tendency to have a snappier recoil and more pronounced muzzle rise as they have less mass to eat up that impulse.

You’ll also often take a hit on capacity — many of these pistols use single-stack magazines to reduce overall size — but given that most self-defense encounters are over in a matter of seconds and happen well under 10 yards, capacity, and sight radius are secondary considerations to ease of carry.

You’ll find descriptions such as compact, subcompact, and micro-compact in this category, and these pistols often make for some of the best concealed carry pistols available.

Home Defense

Duty/home defense guns are generally full-sized with a barrel length of 4 inches or longer — often with a double-stack magazine offering a capacity of 13 rounds or more. Their primary purpose is to support home defense, which often means simple systems with few extras, mostly focusing on optics support, under-barrel rails for lights, and big mags with lots of capacity.

These are larger pistols, which are heavier than CCW options, but that added weight offers more recoil control than smaller pistols.

Range Guns

These kinds of pistols can vary considerably and can include everything from basic plinkers to super-modded competition pistols which big, extended magazines, built-in compensators, and very long barrels for as much sight radius as possible.

FN's 509 series has a variant for almost every use case, with everything from a 509 Compact carry model to this 509 LS Edge, which is a full size, competition-focused version of the pistol.
FN's 509 series has a variant for almost every use case, with everything from a 509 Compact carry model to this 509 LS Edge, which is a full size, competition-focused version of the pistol.

5. Customization

Many of the best 9mm pistols will have modular components that allow for the user to customize various aspects of the grip and frame to their preference. Some pistols have fantastic grips with textured surfaces or ergonomic shapes.

These textured surfaces are great since they make the pistol easier to hold, even if your palm is sweaty, but given the diversity of hand shapes and sizes, not every grip is perfect for every hand. A modular pistol enables almost anyone to get their fit right, which is critical for effective shooting.

The Beretta APX family has a size that's right for everyone. From left to right: the full-size, compact, and sub-compact APX.
The Beretta APX family has a size that's right for everyone. From left to right: the full-size, compact, and sub-compact APX.
A 9mm hollow-point mushrooms with the best of them.
A 9mm hollow-point mushrooms with the best of them.

Introduced by Georg Luger around 1900 for use in the toggle-action semi-automatic military pistol that carries his name, the 9mm Parabellum– also seen as 9×19, 9mm Luger, and 9mm Para– became popular initially in Central Europe.

Then, by the early 1940s when handguns like the Astra 600, Browning Hi-Power, Poland’s Radom VIS, and the Finnish/Swedish Lahti were in circulation, it started to become a more worldwide cartridge. Shortly after World War II, it was the staple cartridge in use with Western military combat as well as law enforcement duty pistols, spreading to America by 1954 with the Smith & Wesson Model 39.

Within a few decades, the light-recoiling 9mm, which still provided effective ballistic performance with appropriate bullets, had largely replaced both lighter rounds such as the .380 and .32 ACP, as well as toppling the vaunted .45ACP in popularity.

In 2017, the FBI tapped it as its standard duty caliber for handguns, a move that cut the legs out from under the .40S&W which had long been billed as splitting the middle ground between 9mm and .45ACP.

There are more load options available for the 9mm than any other handgun caliber today.
There are more load options available for the 9mm than any other handgun caliber today.

In short, today’s 9mm now stands atop the mountain when it comes to modern pistol calibers as it is controllable for both novice and experienced shooters, is typically available in a diverse range of loadings — from target to defensive ammunition to hunting uses — and its short overall length allows it to performs as advertised in a full-sized or compact pistol.

Why the 9mm?

Boxes of  9mm ammo
Boxes of 9mm ammo

First and foremost, the 9mm is a widely available cartridge. While things might get a little dicey depending on political panics here in the U.S., it is still one of the easiest cartridges to find.

You can likely get up from your desk right now and find 9mm for sale on a shelf right now within a 20 min drive of your current location. Since it is so easy to get when compared with, for example, .32 ACP, it stands to reason that people will keep using firearms in ammunition types that they can get access to quickly.

A U.S. Air Force pararescueman, assigned to the 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron, Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, fires his Glock 9mm handgun during weapons training Feb. 21, 2018.  The pararescuemen train with their secondary weapon to ensure they remain capable of firing in the event their primary weapon becomes ineffective or runs out of ammo. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Gregory Brook)
A U.S. Air Force pararescueman, assigned to the 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron, Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, fires his Glock 9mm handgun during weapons training Feb. 21, 2018. The pararescuemen train with their secondary weapon to ensure they remain capable of firing in the event their primary weapon becomes ineffective or runs out of ammo. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Gregory Brook)

Secondly, 9mm is relatively affordable. Again, this will change with the times and ammunition has been creeping up in cost overall through the past several decades.

With that said, companies have been making 9mm for a century at this point, and they have to compete with one another to some degree. Thus, it is still feasible for most people who want to get into the hobby of shooting to pick up a 9mm handgun and some ammunition for a cost that is at least somewhat palatable.

Ideally, prices will come down in the future, but 9mm is still one of the more budget-friendly rounds.

These days, the most reliably handguns that you are likely to find are in 9mm.

Take Glocks, for example. With millions of units sold, military contracts, police use, and so on, the company has a lot of incentive to make their guns run well and a lot of user data to back up their research.

9mm pistols, like the Glock 19, have such tremendous aftermarket support you can even find conversion kits that enable you to transform them into PDWs.
9mm pistols, like the Glock 19, have such tremendous aftermarket support you can even find conversion kits that enable you to transform them into PDWs.

That’s why so many 9mm platforms have been iterated over several generations, and they tend to get more reliable over time. For us, that means guns that tend to go bang when you want them to and not to go bang when you drop them by accident.

Firearms in 9mm also tend to have more modern designs that allow for a lot of customization from the perspective of a relative handy user.

Today, it’s not awfully difficult to take a stock handgun from several manufacturers and make it exactly how you want it in terms of lights, magazine sie, slide length, optics, and so forth.

The ability to tailor a firearm to a specific user, in our view, is a great thing that will keep people shooting firearms in that caliber. Older designs are a lot harder to work on, and so new 9mms are likely to stay popular for the time being.

Shooting 9mm rounds with the PSA PA9 PCC fitted with their AR9 upper.
Shooting 9mm rounds with the PSA PA9 PCC fitted with their AR9 upper.

Finally, the 9mm has proven itself to be exceptionally adaptable in terms of its usage. You can fire them out of rifles, submachine guns, and several flavors of pistols. No matter what, they seem to work well, maintain decent accuracy, and can be loaded for everything from long-range to use with a suppressor.

This adaptability in terms of usage, format, and bullet type gives us, as shooters, many reasons to stick with the caliber, even if it would be possible to make others good at one or two things.

Wrap Up

The 9mm handguns of today represent the cutting edge of firearms development, with over a century of lessons learned coaching along that evolutionary process to its current pinnacle.

With so many designs offered, there is something to fit every need and personal preference for those looking for a quality pistol that can last a lifetime. Do your research and choose wisely, and the odds of being disappointed are slim.

Further Reading

  1. Shooting Industry, Firearms Sales Report
  2. Smith & Wesson, Shield EZ Recall
  3. YouTube, Sig Issues
  4. ATF, Firearms Commerce Report
Bell

Updated

May 4, 2023 — After reassessing this list, we’ve shortened it considerably, reducing it from seventeen to the top ten included in this new, updated version. We’ve also replaced the Taurus G3C with the smaller, newer GX4. We’re also planning on reviewing the Walther PDP F and Sig P320 AXG Legion to see if they can make the cut for this guide.

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